Connect with us

Campus Crime

China’s #MeToo Movement Is Just Beginning

How one student’s death twenty years ago has started a revolution.

Published

on

Twenty years ago, Gao Yan, a Chinese Literature student at Peking University, “was raped by a professor, her friends and relatives say, and soon after she killed herself”, according to the New York Times.

Recently, there has been a wave of people who have read and shared her story online, and in result of that, the male dominated government has deployed censors to stamp it out.

To much surprise, these universities have been extremely dedicated to their students rights, and have acted on these claims.

According to the South China Morning Post “Shen Yang, the academic accused of raping Gao Yan – who denies the allegations – had been fired from jobs at Shanghai Normal University and Nanjing University after the claims came to light. Peking University where he worked until 2012, announced last week that he “had been given a major demerit in 1998 after being accused of having sexual relations with student Gao Yan.”

#MeToo is unfortunately a controversial subject. With the Communist Party’s tight control of civil society, and universities acting upon these matters, everyone is wondering what’s next to come.

Are you looking to get more experience in digital media? Join the CMN team as a writer or social media producer and get real-time experience, intense feedback on your writing and a great place to display your work.You can get academic credit, too. Check out our current opportunities here.

Erin Whitten is currently CMN's Senior Correspondent and is currently a student at Arizona State University majoring in Mass Communications and Media Studies.

Sign up for the Morning Scoop

and wake up with us each day.

CMN Reports

Top Reads