Connect with us

Entertainment

‘Dear White People:’ Returns to Netflix for Season Two

Winchester University classes are back in session. Are you ready to binge watch?

Danielle Germain

Published

on

Based on Justin Simien’s acclaimed movie, Dear White People, the story is set at a predominantly white Ivy League institution where racial tension is high. The film follows the stories of four black student where controversy breaks out when a popular but problematic “black-face” party is thrown by white students.

Dear White People — the series, also created by Simien, picks up where the movie left off; following Samantha White, Lionel Higgins, Joelle Brooks, Reggie Green and Colandrea “Coco” Conners, a group of Winchester University’s students of color, as they navigate through college, while dealing issues of social injustice, cultural bias and activism. In the last five minutes of the season finale, we see many gathered in the student union, following the immediate aftermath of a failed protest and a rowdy town hall. The students, watching Defamation, a parody of Scandal, described the gathering as “the epicenter of black life at Winchester.”

Season 2 will be structured around the arrest of Troy Fairbanks, the student body president, and the Dean’s son. Troy, taking part in the protest, and fueled with anger, broke the glass door of a building on campus. One of the most powerful moments of the season finale was watching Dean Fairbanks yell “Don’t Resist” to his son, and in the same breath ‘Don’t Shoot” to the police motioning to pull a gun on Troy. The brief interaction between police and black bodies, struck a cord with many.

The storyline, although fictional, shines a very real light on some of the struggles people of color are faced with, not only while being on a PWI campus, but living in not so “post-racial” America.

On Friday, May 4, the entire second season of Dear White People will be available on Netflix.

Did you enjoy this article? Consider supporting College Media Network's mission to support the next generation of journalists. For as little as $2 a month, you can help keep our site ad-free and the future of journalism alive. Go here to donate.

Danielle Germain is a Junior at The American University in Washington, D.C. Danielle is a Broadcast Journalism Major and a Political Science Minor. She aspires to be a Political Commentator or a Political Analyst. During the school year, Danielle balances 2 Jobs, an internship and serves on 4 Executive Boards, ranging from the Vice President of Programming for Caribbean Circle to the Social Media Director and Web Manager for The Blackprint — a news publication aimed towards students of color. This summer, Danielle will be joining the Macy's Inc. team as their Corporate Communications Intern. She can be reached at dg0060a@student.american.edu"

Sign up for the Morning Scoop

and wake up with us each day.

CMN Reports

National News8 hours ago

Teen Who Urged Boyfriend’s Suicide Through Text Says It Was Free Speech

Apparently, the First Amendment extends to telling your boyfriend to get back into the truck and kill himself.

by , Penn State University
Entertainment2 days ago

Stormy Daniels ‘Set up’ in Police Sting Operations

A juicy piece of the Stormy Daniels saga.

by , Senior Editor
Entertainment3 days ago

Build-A-Bear ‘Pay Your Age’ Deal Ends in Failure

Would you wait in a line for hours, for a $29.00 teddy? Many did, which ended in chaos.

by , CMN Senior Correspondent
Entrepreneurship3 days ago

Papa John’s Founder Resigns After Using Racial Slur

Papa John's is on the search for a new face.

by , U. Alabama Birmingham
Equality3 days ago

Department of Justice Reopens Investigation Into Emmett Till Case

New information arises in the case that shed light on racial violence and inspired the civil rights movement.

by , American University
Awww4 days ago

Cardi B and Offset Announce Birth of Their Daughter

Welcome to the world, Kulture Kiari Cephus.

by , American University
Education4 days ago

Groundbreaking Experiment Designs Cancer Cells Attack to Their Own Tumors

New research on genome-edited tumor cells could hold the key to successful cancer treatment.

by , University of Albany
National News4 days ago

To Showcase the Boys’ Rescue, Tham Luang Cave Will Become a Museum

An educational way of commemorating the crazy mission.

by , U. Alabama Birmingham

Top Reads