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Do the Most Common Vitamins and Minerals Really Work? Not Really, Says New Study

In reality, everyday supplements do practically nothing.

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In a study published in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology, researchers found that the most common supplements, multivitamins, vitamin D, calcium and vitamin C, don’t help to reduce or increase risk of cardiovascular disease, heart attack, stroke or premature death.

That is, taking these supplements has no real advantage, but does no harm either.

Researchers only found a positive effect in folic acid alone and B-vitamins with folic acid in reducing cardiovascular disease and stroke.

“These findings suggest that people should be conscious of the supplements they’re taking and ensure they’re applicable to the specific vitamin or mineral deficiencies they have been advised of by their healthcare provider,” Dr Jenkins of St. Michael’s Hospital said. “It’s most beneficial to rely on a healthy diet to get your fill of vitamins and minerals. So far, no research on supplements has shown us anything better than healthy servings of less processed plant foods including vegetables, fruits and nuts.”

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Gigi Foster is a student at the University of North Carolina Wilmington. She's a midfielder on the women's soccer team and is studying ocean sciences.

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