Connect with us

Ivy League

Harvard Names New President

Lawrence Bacow, who has held various roles at the school, will take over this summer.

Published

on

Harvard University has hired one of its own as the 29th university president.

Lawrence Bacow, a member of the Harvard Corporation, will take what is perhaps America’s most prestigious university post, taking over from Drew G. Faust, the school’s first female president. Faust has been Harvard’s president since 2007 and announced this past June that she would be stepping down this summer.

The school made the announcement yesterday afternoon, ending a nearly seven-month search for a new leader. Bacow was a member of the committee that started the initial search, but ended up becoming its final target.

Bacow was previously president of Tufts University and the chancellor at MIT.

The Harvard Crimson reports:

Bacow, a Michigan native, hails from a family of immigrants. His mother was an Auschwitz survivor and his father was a refugee from the pogroms of Eastern Europe. At Sunday’s press conference—his first public appearance as the president-elect—Bacow told his parents’ story and spoke about the impact of higher education on his own life.

“It was higher education that made this all possible, and I look forward to working every day as president of Harvard to ensure that future generations benefit from the same opportunity that my family had and so many of us, I suspect, who sit in this room today also have—and that is the opportunity to experience the American dream,” he said.

Dacow takes the helm at a time many experts see as a crossroads for U.S. higher education, including an unfriendly administration who are pushing on a tax on college endowments that could ding Harvard for millions.

Natalia is a recent graduate of George Mason University where she studied Communication (Journalism concentration) and Global Affairs (Environment concentration) in Fairfax, Virginia. She's looking to enter the media field as a writer and combine her passion of journalism and the environment.

Education

Inside the Ivy: Hazing Allegations and Discrimination

Brown’s men’s swim team, a religious organization at Harvard, and Prince Charles’ appreciation of Cornell.

Published

on

Brown’s men’s swim team barred from Championships #busted

The men’s swimming and diving team for Brown University will not be participating in the Ivy League Championship due to an investigation into hazing allegations against the team.

The Brown Daily Herald reports, “in addition, the team’s schedule no longer lists the National Collegiate Athletic Association Swimming and Diving Championships, which will take place in March. The women’s team schedule still lists these meets.”

The men’s team roster also removed the two senior captains that were previously listed.

Sexual assault and guns may be the hot issues of the moment, but homophobia is still a problem

Harvard University’s Office of Student Life has placed the religious group Harvard College Faith and Action (HCFA) on probation after the organization forced a female member of its student leadership to step down because she was dating a woman.

The Harvard Crimson reports, “the decision to suspend HCFA, though, is almost certainly tied to the Sept. 2017 resignation of a female bisexual former assistant Bible course leader. HCFA leadership asked the woman to step down from her position after they learned she was dating another female student—violating guidelines laid out in the Harvard College Student Handbook, which stipulates recognized campus student groups cannot discriminate on the basis of ‘sexual orientation.'”

Confirmation of this order of events came from 12 current and former members of HCFA as well as documents, emails and text messaged obtained and reviewed by the Crimson.

Randoms:

Prince Charles talks up Cornell

Step up your Olympic-watching game with this UPenn idea

Quote of the Week:

“People are dying, and I think it’s about time somebody called BS.”

– Senior Maya Kassutto at a UPenn gun protest

Tweet of the Week:

Continue Reading

Academics

Inside the Ivy: New Presidents and Immigration

The one with Harvard, new presidents and immigration reform panels.

Published

on

Harvard finally names a new president

Harvard University has hired one of its own as the 29th university president, Lawrence Bacow.

The Harvard Crimson reports, “Bacow, 66, formerly served as the president of Tufts University and the chancellor of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. He has also held roles at the Kennedy School, the Graduate School of Education, the Law School—and, most recently, on Harvard’s own search committee.”

Bacow will be taking over at a precarious time for higher education and Harvard; he will face a presidency that goes against university ideals and has enacted tax policies that will cost the university millions, an underperforming endowment and the roll out of Harvard’s controversial policy that penalizes membership in single-gender social organizations.

Jeb Bush and Joe Biden at Penn’s Silfen Forum

The Daily Pennsylvanian reports, “Members of the Senate failed to advance any immigration laws on Feb. 15, leaving the fate of various U.S. immigrants in an ongoing state of limbo. News of the vote came in as hundreds of attendees sat in Irvine Auditorium, listening to former Vice President Joe Biden and former Governor of Florida Jeb Bush discuss immigration policy with Penn President Amy Gutmann.”

The event, “Policy Adrift: A 21st Century Framework for Asylum Seekers, Refugee’s and Immigration Policy,” was part of an annual series of panel discussions on modern issues.

Conversation on the panel quickly shifted to the ongoing uncertainty surrounding the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program.

Randoms:

A little bit of hope for a tough week and love for Valentine’s Day

Princeton has its own dating app

Quote of the Week:

“#MeToo is just so simple. It is really just a conversation starter. Or, [it can be] the whole conversation. This is a movement that’s about healing. [The phrase] comes from a place of trying to connect.

– Tarana Burke, #MeToo movement founder and leader at Brown University

Tweet of the Week

Continue Reading

Academics

Yale Starts Financial Aid Program to Cover Sorority Dues

Yale University hopes to reduce financial distress caused by membership dues with a new financial aid program.

Published

on

For people in Greek life, membership costs can be a source of financial distress. Yale University hopes to change that with a new financial aid program.

The Yale Panhellenic Council announced that they will be launching their first financial aid program this Spring semester.

Each of Yale’s four sororities, Alpha Phi, Kappa Alpha Theta, Kappa Kappa Gamma and Pi Beta Phi will receive roughly $200 to cover for membership dues according to Panhellenic Council President Lucy Friedmann ’19.

Members of the Kappa Alpha Theta sorority tabling on campus.

“We decided that as a body, we have the capacity to give more money,” Friedmann said to Yale Daily News. “It’ll be up to each sorority’s discretion whether they give it to one person or distribute it among people who need financial aid.”

Friedmann also said the funding for the new financial aid program will come from registration fees the council collected in previous years and has saved. According to Yale Daily News, the registration fee for sorority recruitment was $15.

Other colleges have started initiatives like that to help with membership costs in the past. At Penn State, the Panhellenic Council founded the Panhellenic Scholarship Fund in 2013 to “help multiple women who need financial assistance with their sorority dues.”

That year the fund split $3540 between 12 recipients and in 2016 it provided $3,830  to 17 recipients, according to The Daily Pennsylvanian.

The move came after students at Penn indicated that sorority membership dues, which ranged from $550 to $917 for freshmen not living in-house in 2015, posed a significant obstacle for students from lower income backgrounds.

At Cornell University and Columbia University, financial aid does not cover sorority membership fees, though sororities at the two schools have the option of offering their own financial aid, according to The Daily Pennsylvanian.

 

At Yale University, Alpha Phi requires new members to pay $750 for their first semester, $430 for their second semester and $350 for subsequent semesters. Kappa asks new members to pay $495 and active members to pay $395 every subsequent semester.

Pi Phi required members to pay $665 for their first semester and $411 for each subsequent semester. Theta required new members to pay $662 for their first two semesters, and active members to pay $487 in the fall semester and $395 in the spring semester.

Some were doubtful whether the amount offered would make much of a difference.

Kat Corfman ’21, who participated in this year’s rush but decided not to join a sorority, said to Yale Daily News that she appreciated the Panhellenic Council’s efforts to make Greek life more accessible at Yale but is unsure whether $200 would “make much of a dent,” considering the total cost of dues for each member.

Continue Reading

Sign up for the Morning Scoop

and wake up with us each day.

CMN Reports

Campus Crime5 mins ago

Pennsylvania University Stunned by Child Pornography Allegations

Popular philosophy professor at Bloomsburg University charged with possessing child porn.

National News10 hours ago

Did the College Board Use Florida Shooting as Advertising Strategy?

A controversial mass email sent by the College Board on Wednesday has gone viral.

National News10 hours ago

College Grants Scholarship Aid to Slain Police Officer’s Family

Eric Joering was fatally shot while on duty on February 10th.

Ajit Pai at podium Ajit Pai at podium
National News14 hours ago

States Fight Back Against FCC’s Orders to End Net Neutrality in April

Nearly half the states in the U.S. are fighting for net neutrality.

by , Western Governors University
National News1 day ago

Florida Students Swarm the Capitol and Demand Reform

These students are here to say that they understand what is going on and want reform.

by , West Chester
Campus Crime2 days ago

California Man Arrested with AR-15 After Threats to Shoot Up College

27-year-old made threats on Facebook against an unspecified college.

Free Speech2 days ago

University of Vermont Students and Faculty Rally Against Racial Injustices

The rallies come as a response to growing racial tensions on the University of Vermont campus.

by , Colorado State University
Charity2 days ago

Thousands Donated to Help Fight Against Gun Violence

Celebrities contribute for a cause.

by , University of Texas

Top Reads