Connect with us

Business

How Facebook Could Reinvent Itself: Three Ideas From Academia

The company can take a number of steps to address privacy concerns.

The Conversation

Published

on

Jeff Inglis, The Conversation

Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg’s testimony in front of Congress, following disclosures of personal data being misused by third parties, has raised the question over how and whether the social media company should be regulated. But short of regulation, the company can take a number of steps to address privacy concerns and the ways its platform has been used to disseminate false information to influence elections.

Scholars of privacy and digital trust have written for The Conversation about concrete ideas – some of them radical breaks with its current business model – the company could use right away.

1. Act like a media company

Facebook plays an enormous role in U.S. society and in civil society around the world. The leader of a multiyear global study of how digital technologies spread and how much people trust them, Tufts University’s Bhaskar Chakravorti, recommends the company accept that it is a media company, and therefore

take responsibility for the content it publishes and republishes. It can combine both human and artificial intelligence to sort through the content, labeling news, opinions, hearsay, research and other types of information in ways ordinary users can understand.”

2. Focus on truth

Facebook could then, perhaps, embrace the mission of journalism and watchdog organizations, and as American University scholars of public accountability and digital media systems Barbara Romzek and Aram Sinnreich suggest,

start competing to provide the most accurate news instead of the most click-worthy, and the most trustworthy sources rather than the most sensational.”

3. Cut users in on the deal

If Facebook wants to keep making money from its users’ data, Indiana University technology law and ethics scholar Scott Shackelford suggests

“flip[ping] the relationship and having Facebook pay people for their data, [which] could be [worth] as much as US$1,000 a year for the average social media user.”

The ConversationThe multi-billion-dollar company has an opportunity to find a new path before the public and lawmakers weigh in.

Jeff Inglis is the Science + Technology Editor for The Conversation.This article was originally published on The Conversation.Read the original article.

Jumpstart a career doing something you are passionate about with one of College Media Network’s courses. Read about our current offerings, schedule and unique virtual learning environment here.

CMN Reports

National News4 days ago

Poll: Almost 40% of College and University Undergraduates Nationwide Favor Socialism

Socialism is slowly rising amongst college youth.

by , The Catholic American University
Employment2 weeks ago

California Bans Discrimination Based on Natural Hairstyles

The Golden State is combating discrimination based on appearance.

by , The Catholic American University
Equality3 weeks ago

The Supreme Court Determines the Fate of Political Representation

The country's high court determines the future of representation.

by , The Catholic American University
Equality2 months ago

Colorado Bans Conversion Therapy for LGBTQ Youth

The Centennial State moves forward in progress for the queer community.

by , The Catholic American University
Government2 months ago

Illinois Legalizes Recreational Marijuana

The Prairie State advances towards cannabis legalization.

by , The Catholic American University
Government2 months ago

New Hampshire Becomes the 21st State to Abolish Capital Punishment

The Granite State makes a huge step towards criminal justice reform.

by , The Catholic American University
Equality2 months ago

Maine Bans LGBTQIA+ Conversion Therapy for Minors

The Pine Tree State further progresses in queer rights.

by , The Catholic American University
Election 20202 months ago

Elijah Manley: The Youngest Person to Ever Run for U.S. President

Meet the youngest person ever to run for U.S. president.

by , The Catholic American University

Most Read From CMN Writers

[]
1 Step 1
keyboard_arrow_leftPrevious
Nextkeyboard_arrow_right

Copyright © College Media Network