Connect with us

Academics

Inside The Ivy: Temporary Protected Status, Unions, and Poetry

Harvard workers with temporary protected status want protection from deportation, Columbia grad students fight to unionize, and more.

Published

on

In the News

Harvard workers with Temporary Protected Status want security

Harvard Temporary Protected Status workers delivered a letter to university president Drew Faust Wednesday, asking that she take solid action to protect them from possible deportation.

The Harvard Crimson reports, “a total of about 50 workers, students, faculty, staff, and supporters from campus unions gathered outside of Faust’s Massachusetts Hall office to deliver the letter.”

Concern among TPS workers has risen over the last few months after the Trump administration ended the TPS programs for citizens of El Salvador, Haiti, Nicaragua, and Sudan.

Columbia still isn’t down with the graduate student union

Columbia University will not be bargaining with graduate student’s request to unionize, taking the conflict to court

The Columbia Daily Spectator reports, “In recent months, the University has filed multiple objections to the results of an election in which graduate students voted to unionize last spring. Last month, the National Labor Relations Board ruled against the University’s latest objection, prompting graduate students to deliver an initial bargaining request to University President Lee Bollinger. Columbia’s refusal to bargain on Tuesday is its first official response to that request.”

This action by the university could cause a delay of several months, if not years, according to legal experts

Randoms:

What if there were more than eight ivy leagues?

Mystery shows to watch according to UPenn

Three Dartmouth alumni who made it onto Forbes 30 under 30 list

Quote of the Week:

“I am very honest in saying that that the type of conception of poetry is actually rooted in white supremacy. The personal is political. The fact that you have the luxury as a white male to write all your poems about being lost in the woods, that you don’t have to interrogate race and gender, is a political statement in and of itself. Saying that the type of writing that interrogates the very real issues of gender, of race, of the economy, isn’t real or is not poetry is actually a way to safeguard the European and Western clutch over poetry.”

– Amanda Gorman, first U.S. Youth Poet Laureate and Harvard student on traditional poetry being anything but political

Tweet of the Week:

 

Natalia is a recent graduate of George Mason University where she studied Communication (Journalism concentration) and Global Affairs (Environment concentration) in Fairfax, Virginia. She's looking to enter the media field as a writer and combine her passion of journalism and the environment.

Sign up for the Morning Scoop

and wake up with us each day.

CMN Reports

Top Reads