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Judge Rosemarie Aquilina Remains in the Spotlight After Nassar Trial

The trial serves as a facet of the #MeToo and #TimesUp movements that call for accountability and change against sexual assault and harassment, and Aquilina’s strength marked a move towards the accountability of sexual predators.

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It’s been one week since former USA Gymnastics doctor and osteopathic physician at Michigan State, Larry Nassar, was sentenced to 175 years in prison for decades of sexual abuse. One important figure stands out amidst the national attention the case received: Judge Rosemarie Aquilina.

Aquilina has received praised on social media for her time residing over the high profile case. The video of her throwing away the letter Nassar wrote about how difficult it was for him to listen to the extended amount of testimonies against him from multiple victims circulated throughout Twitter as a stand against sexual predators.

This is not the first high profile case has Aquilina presided over. She was the judge in the 2006 case against seven-year-old Ricky Holland’s adoptive parents; who were accused of killing their adopted son. She also filed an advisory memorandum to former President Obama in 2013 after finding the city of Detroit in violation of the state constitution by filing bankruptcy.

Victims of Nassar have come forward to praise Judge Aquilina for her strength while providing over the case. Aquilina’s no-nonsense attitude gained her the nickname “Barracuda Aquilina” during her 20 years as the first female Judge Advocate General’s Corps Officer of the Michigan Army National Guard. Olympic gymnasts like Jordyn Weiber and Simone Biles are among many thanking Aquilina.

“She’s a boss,” Biles told NBC, “But the Judge is my hero because she gave it to him straight and didn’t let him get any power over the girls.”

The trial serves as a facet of the #MeToo and #TimesUp movements that call for accountability and change against sexual assault and harassment, and Aquilina’s strength marked a move towards the accountability of sexual predators.

Savannah is a third year Journalism major with a French minor at Colorado State University. She works as a Communications Intern for the CSU Alumni Association, and hopes to one day work in a French speaking country.

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