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What’s New in Emojis for 2018?

Let’s hear it for the addition of Red Haired emoji.

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Oh emojis. 

Those cute emoticons that let you send smiling poo to friends and family. 2018 is now here, which means dozens of new emojis will be landing in your smartphone soon.

As a red-haired writer, what I am most here for is the addition of Red Haired emojis.

“People felt like they were getting left out,” says Jeremy Burge of the Unicode Emoji Subcommittee (UES), which is part of the Unicode Consortium, which sets the international standards for emojis, among other things. “Even though I don’t have red hair myself, that was the number one request we got for the last two years running. So I felt like I should step up and try and make that happen,” Burge stated.

According to the Emojipedia 6.0 for the 2018 release, Users may be able to change emoji direction in 2018.

Emojipedia users have long requested a way to flip emoji direction, and if this feature goes ahead it is likely to target only the emojis that would benefit from it most.

Unfortunately, not all make the cut. Removed from earlier candidate lists are Grinning Face With Letters OK As EyesFrowning Pile Of Poo, and Frowning Face With Question Marks As Eyes.

Well, you can’t win ’em all.

Erin is a Demi Lovato fan, Mass Communication and Media Studies major, and Multi-Media Specialist for the City of Chelsea, in that order.

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National News

States Fight Back Against FCC’s Orders to End Net Neutrality in April

Nearly half the states in the U.S. are fighting for net neutrality.

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On Thursday morning the Federal Communications Commission published their order in the Federal Register to repeal net neutrality, which is set to go into effect on April 23, 2018.

Now that the final rule has been published by the FCC, entities can begin to file legal challenges against the order. In response to the order, 22 state attorneys general and the District of Columbia refiled legal challenges in an attempt to block the repeal of net neutrality.

The states had filed previously petitions preserving their right to sue in January; however, they agreed to withdraw the petitions last Friday until the FCC’s official publication.

The multi-state lawsuit is led by New York Attorney General Eric Schneiderman, and a petition was filed the same day the FCC published their order. States backing up New York in this battle include California, Oregon, North Carolina, Hawaii, and Minnesota.

According to the petition, the states find that the FCC order is, “arbitrary, capricious, and an abuse of discretion within the meaning of the Administrative Procedure Act.” The states also find that the order violates federal law, “including, but not limited to, the Constitution, the Communications Act of 1934, as amended, and FCC regulations promulgated thereunder.”

The FCC voted last December 3-2 to overturn the 2015 rules that prevent internet service providers from blocking, slowing access to, or charging more for specific content on the internet.

The 22 attorneys general are not alone in the battle over net neutrality. Internet giants including Netflix, Kickstarter, and Amazon made it clear on Twitter that they disagreed with the FCC’s vote in December.

Even Burger King had something to say about the battle for net neutrality.

The publication triggers a 60-legislative-day deadline for Congress to vote on whether or not the FCC’s decision should be overturned. According to the leader of the coalition against the repeal of net neutrality, the battle has only just begun.

 

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Tech

Apple Releases Update that Fixes iPhone Crash Bug

Telugu has nothing on the iPhone (anymore).

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A bug capable of crashing iPhones and rendering apps like Messages, Facebook Messenger, and WhatsApp useless was discovered last week. Apple released an update on Monday, which includes a fix for the bug.

The update issued included iOS 11.2.6 for iPhone and iPad, TVOS 11.2.6 for the Apple TV, WatchOS 4.2.3 for all Apple Watch models, and MacOS 10.13.3 for Mac.

According to the release notes by Apple, the update “fixes an issue where using certain character sequences could cause apps to crash” and “fixes an issue where some third-party apps could fail to connect to external accessories.”

The bug was initiated by sending a character in the Indian language (Telugu) on any Apple product that runs iOS 11 or MacOS. Once the message was sent, Apple users were no longer able to open their message apps. The apps would freeze and become unresponsive. In most cases, uninstalling and reinstalling the unresponsive app acted as a temporary fix.

The next major updated will be iOS 11.3, which is scheduled for this spring. According to Apple, the update will bring, “Exciting new ways to experience augmented reality on iPhone and iPad, new Animoji on iPhone X and the ability to view health records in the Health app.”

We can also expect to see music videos in Apple Music, updates to Apple News, and new features that show battery health and whether or not a battery needs to be serviced.

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Apps

There’s Another iOS bug Crashing iPhones, iMessage and Other Apps

Looks like we’ve got a few new bad Apples.

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A bug discovered earlier this week is capable of crashing iPhones, iMessages and various messaging apps, like Facebook messenger and WhatsApp. The news was first reported by Italian blog Mobile World,

The bug is an Indian language (Telugu) character that can be sent through messaging platforms on any Apple product that runs iOS 11 or macOS. Apple users will be unable to open their message app once the bug has been sent.

According to The Verge, the only way for users to recover their message app is to have someone send another message, try to access messages and delete the thread of messages with the special character.

This discovery comes after Apple found multiple software issues before the end of 2017. Apple plans to address the new bug with a new iOS update before the spring release of iOS 11.3. While the bug crashes iMessages with iOS11 or 11.2, those with the beta version of iOS1.3 are immune to the issue.

Apple products encountered similar problems in past experiences thanks to other special characters, links or videos. 2015 brought a small string of text that would shut an iPhone down, in 2016 there was a 5-second video that crashed iPhones and 2017 had a link that would freeze an iPhone completely.

Apple will address these issues soon with an updated version of iOS 11.2.

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